The Road Goes Ever On

jadeb0t:

colourfulpantsandarainbowhat:

WHY DO PEOPLE CALL IT FUCK, MARRY, KILL WHEN THEY COULD CALL IT BED, WED, BEHEAD

i think that’s called game of thrones

Or the Tudor Era. Either way.

Nice shot of my little baby cauldron, with a bit of cone and powder incense burning. I’m quite pleased with it. The ceramic spiral on the right is a burner for powder incense that I purchased at PA Ren Faire last fall.

Nice shot of my little baby cauldron, with a bit of cone and powder incense burning. I’m quite pleased with it. The ceramic spiral on the right is a burner for powder incense that I purchased at PA Ren Faire last fall.

foxyshy:

so let me get this straight. anti-choicers took $500,000 dollars worth of pennies and sealed them in a glass case as a “memorial” to “victims” of abortion. i’m going to say that again. these people have locked away $500,000 dollars as a “tribute” to dead blobs of cells instead of donating that money to actual living breathing children who don’t have basic necessities or homes.

anti-choicers are incredible

I feel like this is a really good illustration of just how backwards the anti-choice movement is. They’d rather invest time and money in children who’ve never existed than do anything worthwhile for the living breathing ones who could really use some help.

is there a term for witches who focus more on the fauna side of things than the flora side? besides "green witch," I mean? Green witch covers both but it doesn't feel right because i SUCK at plants.
Anonymous
i thought about “brown witch” but that sounds like poo…
I suppose it does, at that.
Green witchery does include an animal focus, as far as I’m aware, since the term refers to a natural-world affinity in one’s craft that covers plants and animals alike, including animal guides and familiars.
There’s also Hedge witchery, which straddles the border between homecraft and wildcraft and also deals with the borders between the here and the hereafter (and in some cases, the borders between planes).
Cottage witchery also covers domestic animals, since it is an umbrella that covers the major elements of green, kitchen, hedge, and hearth witchery and focuses largely on the home.
Either way, you get critters.

novas-grimoire:

image
That’s my cue! *pouncesnuggle*

I love you, Breekitty. X3 *cuddlesnuggles*

Ah wuv yew tew, Novabeest.

Um, question, which one do you think it's best to do a wand and besom from, hard maple or aspen? I have branches from both trees, enough to do two wands and besoms, and I've even started on doing a want out of the maple, but IDK which one works best. Help?
Anonymous

pomegranateandivy:

I actually don’t use wands, and have no knowledge for what would work best for them. So, I’m going to open this up. Any followers work with wood wands?

Well, Aspen is renowned for bestowing eloquence and grace of tongue upon the bearer, as well as enhancing clairvoyant talents and warding off thieves, so that might make a good house besom.

Maple brings good luck (in fortune and finance alike), and draws love and affection. Maple is also associated with eloquence and persuasion, as well as longevity and good health, and it “plays well with others.” I’d recommend working with Maple for your wand.

Beyonce ft. Nicki Minaj - Single Ladies Remix
502,707 plays

cockfabric:

remember when nicki remixed single ladies and beyonce didn’t remove it from the internet

wired:

theatlantic:

The Quiet Radicalism of All That

The ’90s were golden years for Nickelodeon. The children’s cable television network was home to now cult-classic shows like Are You Afraid of the Dark? (1991-2000), Clarissa Explains It All (1991-’94), The Secret Life of Alex Mack (1994-’98), and Salute Your Shorts (1991-’92)—arguably heretofore unmatched in their clever, un-condescending approach to entertaining young people. Nick News with Linda Ellerbee launched in 1992, and remains to this day one of the only shows on-air devoted to frank, engaging discussions of teen issues and opinions.
But perhaps the program that best embodied the values of Nick in those years was All That, a sketch-comedy show that premiered 20 years ago today. Created by Brian Robbins and Mike Tollin, All That ran for an impressive 10 seasons before it was canceled in 2005. The prolific franchise spawned a number of spin-offs (Good Burger, Kenan & Kel, The Amanda Show) and launched the careers of several comedy mainstays: Kenan Thompson, Amanda Bynes, Nick Cannon, and Taran Killam.
Like Saturday Night Live (which would later hire Thompson and Killam), All That was a communal pop-cultural touchstone. The parents of ’90s kids had the Church Lady, “more cowbell,” and Roseanne Roseannadanna; the kids themselves, though, had Pierre Escargot, “Vital Information,” and Repairman Man Man Man, and we recited their catch-phrases to one another in the cafeteria and on the playground. Although All That was clearly designed as a SNL, Jr., of sorts, it wasn’t merely starter sketch comedy—it was an admittedly daring venture for a children’s network to embark on.
In its own right, All That was a weirdly subversive little show. It never explicitly crossed the line into “mature” territory, but it constantly flirted with the limits of FCC-approved family-friendliness. Take, for instance, the “Ask Ashley” sketch. A barely tween-aged Amanda Bynes (Seasons Three to Six), played an adorably wide-eyed video advice-columnist. Ashley (“That’s me!”) would read painfully dimwitted letters from fans with clearly solvable problems. (Example: “Dear Ashley, I live in a two-story house and my room is upstairs. Every morning, when it’s time to go to school, I jump out the window. So far I’ve broken my leg 17 times. Do you have any helpful suggestions for me?”) She would wait a beat, smile sweetly into the camera, then fly into a manic rage; emitting a stream of G-rated curses, always tantalizingly on the verge of spitting a true obscenity into the mix.
Read more. [Image: Nickelodeon]


They don’t make kid’s shows like they used to — not only in regards to actual content, but also in reference to the diversity of the casting.
Those were the days.

wired:

theatlantic:

The Quiet Radicalism of All That

The ’90s were golden years for Nickelodeon. The children’s cable television network was home to now cult-classic shows like Are You Afraid of the Dark? (1991-2000), Clarissa Explains It All (1991-’94), The Secret Life of Alex Mack (1994-’98), and Salute Your Shorts (1991-’92)—arguably heretofore unmatched in their clever, un-condescending approach to entertaining young people. Nick News with Linda Ellerbee launched in 1992, and remains to this day one of the only shows on-air devoted to frank, engaging discussions of teen issues and opinions.

But perhaps the program that best embodied the values of Nick in those years was All That, a sketch-comedy show that premiered 20 years ago today. Created by Brian Robbins and Mike Tollin, All That ran for an impressive 10 seasons before it was canceled in 2005. The prolific franchise spawned a number of spin-offs (Good Burger, Kenan & Kel, The Amanda Show) and launched the careers of several comedy mainstays: Kenan Thompson, Amanda Bynes, Nick Cannon, and Taran Killam.

Like Saturday Night Live (which would later hire Thompson and Killam), All That was a communal pop-cultural touchstone. The parents of ’90s kids had the Church Lady, “more cowbell,” and Roseanne Roseannadanna; the kids themselves, though, had Pierre Escargot, “Vital Information,” and Repairman Man Man Man, and we recited their catch-phrases to one another in the cafeteria and on the playground. Although All That was clearly designed as a SNL, Jr., of sorts, it wasn’t merely starter sketch comedy—it was an admittedly daring venture for a children’s network to embark on.

In its own right, All That was a weirdly subversive little show. It never explicitly crossed the line into “mature” territory, but it constantly flirted with the limits of FCC-approved family-friendliness. Take, for instance, the “Ask Ashley” sketch. A barely tween-aged Amanda Bynes (Seasons Three to Six), played an adorably wide-eyed video advice-columnist. Ashley (“That’s me!”) would read painfully dimwitted letters from fans with clearly solvable problems. (Example: “Dear Ashley, I live in a two-story house and my room is upstairs. Every morning, when it’s time to go to school, I jump out the window. So far I’ve broken my leg 17 times. Do you have any helpful suggestions for me?”) She would wait a beat, smile sweetly into the camera, then fly into a manic rage; emitting a stream of G-rated curses, always tantalizingly on the verge of spitting a true obscenity into the mix.

Read more. [Image: Nickelodeon]

They don’t make kid’s shows like they used to — not only in regards to actual content, but also in reference to the diversity of the casting.

Those were the days.

Tom Hiddleston math

little-hylian-witch:

As an apology for that sad post appearing on your dash by my hand…

shezzablue:

grimmthepansexualgoth:

shezzablue:

19z:

nintendoodle:

black-knife:

moniquill:


Abandoned 123 year old school

For sale: totally not haunted, we promise. Like we pinky swear. No wailing child ghosts. No endless walls of text about the coming of the end times appearing on chalk boards when you turn your back. No creepy singing. Totally cool.

plant blog

this is a building not a plant

Creepy

I’d buy it, ghosts or no ghosts. Don’t give a flippity dippity, I ain’t scured. 

How much is it?

Bugger off I have dibs first. XD

Behold the witch village’s academy, pre-renovation. X3

shezzablue:

grimmthepansexualgoth:

shezzablue:

19z:

nintendoodle:

black-knife:

moniquill:

Abandoned 123 year old school

For sale: totally not haunted, we promise. Like we pinky swear. No wailing child ghosts. No endless walls of text about the coming of the end times appearing on chalk boards when you turn your back. No creepy singing. Totally cool.

plant blog

this is a building not a plant

Creepy

I’d buy it, ghosts or no ghosts. Don’t give a flippity dippity, I ain’t scured. 

How much is it?

Bugger off I have dibs first. XD

Behold the witch village’s academy, pre-renovation. X3

foodffs:

Fully Loaded Hasselback Potatoes
Really nice recipes. Every hour.
You're totally tsundere Bree you keep threatening to cannibalize me.

You’re the one who said you were a Tchyscake.

Baka. *frowns and looks pointedly away*

Which -dere do you think I am?

psycho-chi:

Tsundere - Hostile outside, loving on the inside

Yandere - Sweet outside, obsessive and psychoic inside

Kuudere - Silent/cool, turns loving afterwards

Dandere - Usually quiet until the right person comes along


Kamidere - Just like tsundere but has a god-like complex

Dorodere - Sweet outside, messed up and disturbed inside

Deredere - Loving and affectionate

Himedere- Just like tsundere, but princess-like

Not enough mental silverware for a shower tonight, plus the Moms are back and they don’t like the noise from the pipes after a certain hour.

So aside from the usual daily ablutions, I washed half my hair in the sink. Yes, half. The top half, the roots, where it gets oily, with a tiny dollop of shampoo and lots of rinsing. The ends don’t seem to get dirty, they just get tangled.

It certainly FEELS clean. I’ll have to wait until it dries and give it a good brushing to be sure. Certainly beats the feeling of dry shampoo. And if it works, I may have just discovered a cannot-make-self-step-into-shower days shortcut to clean-looking hair.

(Explanation: I’m not sure what it is, but there are days when I just do not have the mental or physical wherewithal to get into the shower, no matter how badly I need one. I’ll wash from head to toe at the sink or stand in the tub and scrub down with a bucket and cloth, no problem, but it’s tough cleaning hip-length hair that way. At a previous job several years back, I actually used to wash my hair on my lunch break some days, in the single-stall restroom. Got very good at speed-washing and drying with a hand towel.)